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DIET HIGH IN PROTEIN GOOD FOR HEALTH?

Many famous diets suggest consuming a high amount of protein and very little carbohydrates or low-fat. But what is the meaning of this?

There is no exact definition of “high-protein.” According to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines, the dietary recommendation for protein is between ten and thirty-five percent of one’s total daily intake of fit food.

This means that for the average person who might consume two-thousand calories a day. That’s between two-hundred and seven-hundred calories from protein.

To put that in perspective, one four-ounce serving of turkey contains about thirty-four grams of protein.

So, consuming two to five servings of turkey daily would meet the recommended amount of protein for the average person. Someone consuming outside of this range, thirty-five percent and beyond, would likely be eating a “high” protein nutrition or fit food.

 

what makes protein so important do we need it as part of our Fit Food?

 

First,

fit food, like carbohydrates and fats, it’s a macronutrient, which means that the human body needs it in relatively large quantities — when compared to micronutrients like vitamins and minerals — to survive.

Second,

protein is responsible for maintaining a healthy body, specifically muscle tissue. When we exercise, the protein we eat plays a vital role in repairing the damage done during  physical fitness . And returning our muscles to working order.

Third,

protein also plays a role in our ability to produce hormones. Such as human growth hormone and insulin. Which are vital in the body’s ability to grow and respond to blood sugar levels.

Fourth,

protein consumption also influences almost every bodily process. Enzymes, which are chemicals made up of the building blocks of proteins — amino acids. Are responsible for things like metabolism, reproduction, respiration, and vision.

Fifth,

are you seeing a pattern, yet? — proteins are vital for our blood, as the cells in the blood responsible for transportation and storage of oxygen. Haemoglobin and myoglobin, themselves made up of proteins. As you can see, there is a good reason for protein to be considered an important part of the healthy nutrition fit food and importance of balanced diet. So, if a protein needed for so many important roles within the body, wouldn’t more of it be better?

 

Consumption Of High(er) Protein

 

To answer that, let’s look at some research about the consumption of high(er) protein fit food. (Protein consumption on the higher end of the ten to thirty-five percent recommendation). A report from the  American Journal of Clinical Nutrition  states that “protein generally increases satiety to a greater extent than carbohydrate or fat. And may facilitate a reduction in energy consumption”. Similarly, research also suggests that high-protein diets may be effective for those trying to lose weight and retain lean body mass. Specifically, adults ages fifty years and over may benefit from consuming a higher protein fit food.

 

Is It Safe To Consuming High Amounts Of Protein ?

 

Research does support that a diet high in protein may worsen kidney function in people with kidney disease or susceptibility to kidney stones because the body may have trouble eliminating all the waste products of protein metabolism. However, if you have a healthy kidney, recent research supports that kidney function is not impacted by a diet with twenty to thirty-five percent protein nutrition. What is important to note about research that would investigate the potentially harmful effects of a high-protein diet (i.e. a diet with greater than thirty-five percent of the total daily intake) is that it is that performing this kind of study is unethical and is therefore not highly studied in humans the same way we study the effects of  healthy  physical activity.

There does exist, however, research in rodents that indicates that long-term high-protein diets are harmful. And cause increase inflammation as well as an imbalance of pH within the system causing long term negative effects. Also, research from the  International Scholarly Research  Notices on Nutrition indicates that long-term protein consumption above the recommended daily amount could cause “disorders of bone and calcium homeostasis, disorders of renal function, increased cancer risk, disorders of liver function, and precipitated progression of coronary artery disease”.

 

Is consuming low amounts

of other macronutrients safe?

 

To address the second question, is consuming low amounts of other macronutrients safe, let’s remember that we can only ever consume one-hundred percent of our daily fit food or balanced diet.

Meaning that if protein consumption goes up, above thirty-five percent, then consumption of another macronutrient must go down. As much of the research on this topic suggests, there has risks associated with a decrease in carbohydrates, specifically.

This includes potentially unfavourable changes in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels when less than forty to sixty-five percent of the diet consume is carbohydrates.

This means that when carbohydrates are too low due to protein levels being potentially too high, cholesterol is negatively affected. This also supported in Mansor et al. 2016. As this systematic review compared results of eleven different studies that looked at the results of a fit food which included less than twenty percent carbohydrates.

 

NEW STUDY

 

A new study may have discovered the key exercise amounts per day for sustained weight loss. A study from the University of Copenhagen, published in the American Journal of Physiology, looked at 60 overweight men who desired to lose weight. They divided the group into two sections and dictated their exercise amounts per day. One group was labeled high-exercise and had to work out 60 minutes a day. The second group was labeled moderate-exercise and had to work out 30 minutes a day.


The researchers defined “working out” as being active enough to produce a sweat. The participants were told to eat normally during the duration of the study. The study took place over a 13-week period and the results were surprising. The moderate-exercise group lost 2 pounds more than the high-exercise group. This result was not explainable.

 

Scientifically calculating calories eaten and burnt through exercise, the  moderate-exercise  group actually used more energy than predicted. The conclusion was that exercising for 30 minutes might heighten your metabolism and keep your body burning more energy long after you’ve stopped exercising.